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Ocean Related Links and Organizations

Oceana
To achieve real benefits for the oceans, Oceana conducts focused, strategic campaigns. Each campaign has a specific timeframe and objective that will make a significant difference to the oceans. Each campaign combines scientific, legal, policy and advocacy approaches to reach its goal. Saving the oceans may take decades, but in each of our campaigns we aim to accomplish an important milestone in that effort within two to five years.

World Ocean Observatory
is an Internet-based place of exchange for ocean information, educational services, and public discourse about the ocean defined as an "integrated, global, social system," thereby relating the ocean to climate, biodiversity, fresh water, food, energy, human health, trade, transportation, policy, governance, finance, coastal development, and cultural traditions.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
NOAA is an agency that enriches life through science. Our reach goes from the surface of the sun to the depths of the ocean floor as we work to keep citizens informed of the changing environment around them. From daily weather forecasts, severe storm warnings and climate monitoring to fisheries management, coastal restoration and supporting marine commerce, NOAA’s products and services support economic vitality and affect more than one-third of America’s gross domestic product. NOAA’s dedicated scientists use cutting-edge research and high-tech instrumentation to provide citizens, planners, emergency managers and other decision makers with reliable information they need when they need it.

About Greenpeace
Seen from space the Earth is covered in a blue mantle. It is a planet on which the continents are dwarfed by the oceans surrounding them and the immensity of the marine realm. Greenpeace exists because this fragile earth deserves a voice. It needs solutions. It needs change. It needs action. Greenpeace is an independent global campaigning organization that acts to change attitudes and behavior, to protect and conserve the environment and to promote peace.

About mongabay.com
With more than one million unique visitors per month, Mongabay.com is one of the world's most popular environmental science and conservation news sites. The news and rainforests sections of the site are widely cited for information on tropical forests, conservation, and wildlife. Mongabay.com aims to raise interest in wildlife and wildlands while promoting awareness of environmental issues. Originally the site was based around a text on tropical rainforests written by Rhett A. Butler, but today the site has expanded to other topics (like Madagascar [WildMadagasacar.org]) and is available in versions for kids and in more than two dozen non-English languages. Mongabay.com is also publisher of Tropical Conservation Science, a peer-reviewed, open-access academic journal that seeks to provide opportunities for scientists in developing countries to publish their research in their native languages. Mongabay.com has been featured in the San Francisco Chronicle, Time Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and other national and international publications.

Yale e360
Yale Environment 360 is a publication of the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. 

Also from  Yale Environment 360

  • With Temperatures Rising, Here Comes ‘Global Weirding’
  • Pursuing the Elusive Goal Of a Carbon-Neutral Building
  • The Dam Building Boom: Right Path to Clean Energy?
  • Michael Pollan on What's Wrong with Environmentalism
  • Environmental Failure: A Case for a New Green Politics
  • How The Food Industry Follows Big Tobacco's Strategy
  • More e360 Features

The Ocean Alliance
“Ocean Alliance is a research organization that focuses on whales and marine toxicology.”

Greenpeace Research Laboratories Report (pdf)
May 1998
The worlds' oceans comprise the largest habitat on earth. 71% of the surface of the earth is covered byseawater to an average depth of 3.8km. The total volume of this water is around 1.3 billion cubic kilometres and comprises around 0.24% of the total mass of the earth. (Angel 1997). These statistics hide a considerable diversity of habitat. The abyssal depths of the ocean between 3 and 6km in depth cover 51% of the surface with depths over 6km accounting for less than 2%. The continental slopes between 200m and 3km depth cover 13% of the surface while the continental shelves underlying water up to 200m deep account for 5% of the earth's surface. This huge biological system is richer in major groupings of animals 
than the land. Of the thirty four major taxonomic groupings (phyla) of animals, twenty nine occur in the sea and fourteen are found exclusively there (Tickell 1997). Coral reefs have long been known to very species rich (Paulay 1997) but new research methods have shown the ocean floors also to be extremely rich in biodiversity (Scheltema 1996; Gage 1997). Quite apart from the commercially valuable species it is increasingly being recognised that this diversity of life has an intrinsic moral as well as monetary value (O'Niell 1997; Oksanen 1997; Moyle & Moyle 1995).

RealClimate
RealClimate is a commentary site on climate science by working climate scientists for the interested public and journalists. We aim to provide a quick response to developing stories and provide the context sometimes missing in mainstream commentary. The discussion here is restricted to scientific topics and will not get involved in any political or economic implications of the science. All posts are signed by the author(s), except 'group' posts which are collective efforts from the whole team. This is a moderated forum.

Other Ocean-related Links by Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea
Note: This Site contains links and references to third-party web sites. The linked sites are not under the control of the United Nations, and the United Nations is not responsible for the content of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site. The United Nations provides these links only as a convenience, and the inclusion of a link or reference does not imply the endorsement of the linked site by the United Nations. Whenever possible, these links point to a specific ocean and law of the sea-related page within a web site.  Entries are listed in alphabetical order by full name.

Links to Ocean Related Organizations and Databases
OPEN SEAS INSTRUMENTATION INC
This page contains links to some ocean related Organizations and Data Bases. Also see our Oceanographic Laboratories page and our Commercial Ocean Industries page. 

Reef
REEF was founded in 1990, out of growing concern about the health of the marine environment, and the desire to provide the SCUBA diving community a way to contribute to the understanding and protection of marine populations. REEF achieves this goal primarily through its volunteer fish monitoring program, the REEF Fish Survey Project. Participants in the Project not only learn about the environment they are diving in, but they also produce valuable information. Scientists, marine park staff, and the general public use the data that are collected by REEF volunteers.

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement
On October 1, 2011, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE), formerly the Minerals Management Service (MMS), was replaced by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) as part of a major reorganization.

NOAA
NOAA is an agency that enriches life through science. Our reach goes from the surface of the sun to the depths of the ocean floor as we work to keep citizens informed of the changing environment around them.
From daily weather forecasts, severe storm warnings and climate monitoring to fisheries management, coastal restoration and supporting marine commerce, NOAA’s products and services support economic vitality and affect more than one-third of America’s gross domestic product. NOAA’s dedicated scientists use cutting-edge research and high-tech instrumentation to provide citizens, planners, emergency managers and other decision makers with reliable information they need when they need it.

Ocean Vessels and Large Ships
Large ships such as container ships, tankers, bulk carriers, cruise ships, and Lakers are significant contributors to air pollution in many of our nation’s cities and ports. There are two types of diesel engines used on large ships: main propulsion and auxiliary engines. The main propulsion engines on most large ships are "Category 3" marine diesel engines, which can stand over three stories tall and run the length of two school buses. Auxiliary engines on large ships typically range in size from small portable generators to locomotive-size engines.

 

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